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Dr. Duncan W. Wright, Newcastle University.

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/hca/people/profile/duncanwright.html

 

Publication:

Duncan W Wright (2019) Crafters of Kingship: Smiths, Elite Power, and Gender in Early Medieval Europe, Medieval Archaeology, 63:2, 271-297, DOI: 10.1080/00766097.2019.1670922

IN THE EARLIEST CENTURIES of the Middle Ages, skilled metalsmiths were greatly valued by
cult leaders who required impressive objects to maintain social links and the loyalty of their retainers.
Despite their clear importance, smiths were peripheral characters operating on the fringes of elite communities.
Such treatment may reflect an attempt to limit the influence of metalworkers, whose craft was seen
as supernatural and who themselves were probably spiritual figureheads; archaeological evidence associates
smiths and their tools in symbolic processes of creation and destruction, not only of objects but also
of buildings and monuments. The Church clearly appropriated these indigenous practices, although conversion
eventually saw the pre-eminence of the sacred smith and their practice wane. Anthropological
study provides numerous comparators for skilled crafters acting as supernatural leaders, and also suggests
that as part of their marginal identity, smiths may have been perceived as a distinct gender.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

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https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Andy Seaman, Canterbury Christ Church University.

https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-and-humanities/school-of-humanities/Staff/Profile.aspx?staff=caf3b7084f35e566

 

Leo Sucharyna Thomas, University of Ediburgh.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Leo_Sucharyna_Thomas

 

Publication:

ANDY SEAMAN AND LEO SUCHARYNA THOMAS. 'Hillforts and Power in the British Post-Roman West: A GIS Analysis of Dinas Powys', European Journal of Archaeology 23 (4) 2020, 547–566,  

The (re)occupation of hillforts was a distinctive feature of post-Roman Europe in the fifth to seventh
centuries AD. In western and northern Britain, hillforts are interpreted as power centres associated with
militarized elites, but research has paid less attention to their landscape context, hence we know little
about the factors that influenced their siting and how this facilitated elite power. Geographic
Information Systems (GIS) provide opportunities for landscape research, but are constrained by limitations
of source data and the difficulty of defining appropriate parameters for analysis. This article presents
a new methodology that combines data processing and analytical functions in GIS with techniques
and principles drawn from ‘traditional’ landscape archaeology. A case study, focused on Dinas Powys,
suggests that the strategic siting of this hillfort facilitated control over the landscape and has wider
implications for our understanding of patterns of power in post-Roman Britain.
Keywords: hillforts, power, post-Roman Britain, GIS, viewsheds, least-cost paths

 

Dr. Michelle Comber, University of Ireland Galway.

https://www.nuigalway.ie/our-research/people/geography-and-archaeology/michellecomber/#

 

Publication:

Michelle Comber (2019) Square Ringforts? A Contribution to the Identification of ‘Ringfort’ Types, Medieval Archaeology 63:1, 128-153,  

ONGOING DISCUSSIONS of the monuments commonly referred to as ‘ ringforts’ in Ireland include
the definition and investigation of specific types of these enclosures. Rectilinear, or subsquare, enclosures
comprise one such type, with examples identifiable in the well-preserved archaeological landscape of the
Burren (Co Clare) in western Ireland. It is also possible to extend such identification into the counties of
the western seaboard, from Co Cork in the south to Co Donegal in the north. Questions of chronology,
function, status, and cultural identity are addressed. Although a measure of variation may exist within
the category of rectilinear enclosures, there is some uniformity of morphology and chronology and, perhaps, function.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Emma Brownlee, Girton College, Cambridge.

https://cambridge.academia.edu/EmmaBrownlee

 

Publications:

Emma Brownlee. (2020) 'The Dead and their Possessions: The Declining Agency of the Cadaver in Early Medieval Europe', European Journal of Archaeology 23 (3) 2020, 406–427.

Brownlee, E. Connectivity and Funerary Change in Early Medieval Europe. Antiquity: a quarterly review of archaeology https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.51984.
 
Between the sixth and eighth centuries AD, the practice of furnished burial was widely abandoned in
favour of a much more standardized, unfurnished rite. This article examines that transition by considering
the personhood and agency of the corpse, the different ways bonds of possession can form between
people and objects, and what happens to those bonds at death. By analysing changing grave good use
across western Europe, combined with an in-depth analysis of the Alamannic cemetery of Pleidelsheim,
and historical evidence for perceptions of the corpse, the author argues that the change in grave good use
marks a fundamental change in the perception of corpses.
Keywords: early medieval, personhood, cadaver, funerary practices, grave goods, possession.
 
 
Dr. Michèle Hayeur Smith, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University.
 
Kevin Philbrook Smith, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University.
 
Prof. Karin M. Frei, National Museum of Denmark.
 
Publications:

MICHÈLE HAYEUR SMITH, KEVIN P SMITH & KARIN M FREI (2019). ‘Tangled up in Blue’: The Death, Dress and Identity of an Early Viking-Age Female Settler from Ketilsstaðir, Iceland, Medieval Archaeology, 63:1, 95-127, 

IN 1938, a woman’s burial was uncovered by road builders at Ketilsstaðir in north-eastern Iceland.
Recently, her physical remains and associated funerary goods were re-examined by an international, interdisciplinary
team and formed the basis for an exhibition at the National Museum of Iceland in 2015.
This paper focuses on the items of dress that accompanied the woman in order to gain insights into the
ways her cultural identity was expressed at the time of her death. Here we explore the roles played by
material culture in signaling her identity, and the technologies and trade networks through which she was
connected, visually, to Scandinavia, the British Isles, and the Viking world at large.

 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

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