Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

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Prof. Gordon Noble, University of Aberdeen.

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/geosciences/people/profiles/g.noble#panel_research

https://www.facebook.com/groups/417334508372858

https://twitter.com/northernpicts

@northernpicts

 

Publications:

GORDON NOBLE, MEGGEN GONDEK, EWAN CAMPBELL, NICHOLAS EVANS, DEREK HAMILTON & SIMON TAYLOR (2019) 'A Powerful Place of Pictland: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Power Centre of the 4th to 6th Centuries AD', Medieval Archaeology, 63:1, 56-94, DOI: 10.1080/00766097.2019.1588529

To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/00766097.2019.1588529

 

OUR UNDERSTANDING of the nature of late and post-Roman central places of northern Britain has been hindered by the lack of historical sources and the limited scale of archaeological investigation. New work at Rhynie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland (NJ 49749 26345), has begun to redress this through extensive excavation and landscape survey. This has revealed a Pictish central place of the 4th to 6th centuries AD that has European connections through material culture, iconography and site character. In addition to reviewing the place-name and historical context, this article outlines preliminary reflections on five seasons of excavation and survey in the Rhynie landscape. The article also provides a detailed consideration of chronology, including radiocarbon dating and Bayesian statistical analysis. The results reveal the multi-faceted nature of a major, non-hillfort elite complex of Pictland that comprised a highstatus residence with cult dimensions, a major centre for production and exchange, and a contemporary cemetery. A series of sculptured stones stood in association with the settlement and cemetery and the iconography of the stones, along with the wider archaeological evidence, provides a rich dataset for a renewed consideration of the central places of early medieval northern Britain with broader implications for the nature of power and rulership in late and post-Roman Europe.

 

Noble, G. 2020. 'The problem of the Picts: Searching for a lost people in northern Scotland', Current Archaeology 364 p28-35.

The Picts are a fascinating but archaeologically elusive people who thrived in parts of Scotland in the 4th to 10th centuries AD. What has recent research added to this often obscure picture?

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear  more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

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Dr. Darrin Lowery, Director of Chesapeake Watershed Archaeological Research Foundation, supported by the Maryland Historical Trust, the Smithsonian Institution.

http://cwar.org/About/default.html

https://si.academia.edu/DarrinLowery

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Darrin-Lowery

 

Publication:

Lowery, D.L. 2021. Parsons Island, Maryland: Synthesis of Geoarchaeological Investigations, 2013-2020. Chesapeake Watershed Archaeological Research Foundation, the Maryland Historical Trust, the Smithsonian Institution.

On May 20th, 2013, Dr. John Wah and myself visited Parsons Island, Maryland (see Figures 1.1 and 1.2). The expedition on that day represented my second excursion to Parsons in twenty-one years. My first visit to Parsons occurred in 1992 as part of a collective multi-year archaeological survey of the Kent Island area (see Lowery 1993), which was conducted for the Kent Island Heritage Society, the University of Delaware, and the Maryland Historical Trust. In 1992, Parsons Island encompassed 99-acres (see Figure 1.2) and when we re-visited the island in 2013, the island had eroded to ~78-acres. In 2019, the island had been reduced to ~71-acres and presently Parsons consists of ~69-acres. The perimeter of exposed shoreline also changed markedly during this period of time. In 1992, the island had 2.11 linear miles (3.4 km or 11,159 feet) of coastline and by 2019 the amount of coastline had been reduced to 1.65 linear miles (2.66 km or 8,716 feet). Over the twenty-seven-year period, the island has collectively lost about one-acre of land per year to coastal erosion. With the gradual reduction in linear miles of shoreline over this period, it is clear that the rate of annual land loss has actually increased in recent years. Notably, most of the land loss is focused along the island’s southwest margin. 
Our re-visit to Parsons Island on May 20th, 2013 (see Figure 1.3), originated as a result of our late Pleistocene stratigraphic and geoarchaeological investigations conducted at nearby Miles Point, Talisman Farm, and Barnstable Hill (see Figure 1.4). The collective research conducted at Parsons Island over the succeeding seven years culminated into a better understanding of the Middle Atlantic’s Paleo-American archaeological record (see Figure 1.4), a higher-resolution evaluation of the region’s late Pleistocene upland stratigraphy, and a means to quantify some of the site formation processes along eroding coastal margins. This monograph synthesizes the results of these investigations. Regardless of the possible age of the Paleo-American record noted at Parsons Island, the primary objective has always been salvage. Some “academicians” and a few “cultural resource managers” view investigations at eroding coastal archaeological sites in the Chesapeake Bay region as being “biased” and “anecdotal” (see Custer 2018: 202). It should be obvious, the erosive effects by the estuarine water of the Chesapeake Bay are unbiased and these waters will indiscriminately destroy both historic sites, as well as prehistoric sites. The results of our collective investigation at Parsons Island also proves that if follow-up investigations are made at “untrustworthy” (Ibid) sites, “anecdotal” discoveries can make major contributions to the regional, as well as North America’s geoarchaeological record. 
In 2019, the Chesapeake Watershed Archaeological Research foundation applied for a non-capital grant from the Maryland Historical Trust. The goal of the proposal was to synthesize all of the prior work at Parsons Island, document the island’s archaeological record, and conduct limited excavations inland of the shoreline at 18QU1047 to determine if any in-situ cultural deposits remained. Earlier work conducted by the Smithsonian Institution in 2017 had uncovered a small in-situ quartz flake and charcoal located two-meters beneath the ground surface and within a buried paleosol. Like several other radiometric ages on charcoal associated with lithic artifacts found in-situ and exposed along the eroding bank, the Smithsonian date was greater than 20,000 years old. Paleo-botanical remains from this surface are consistent with the presumed age and the OSL-ages on the overlying sediments indicate comparable estimates for the underlying buried surface. 
This monograph, which was funded by the Maryland Historical Trust’s Historic Preservation Non-Capital Grant program, attempts to synthesize the collective analytical results conducted by various
researchers. The monograph also shows that the discoveries at Parsons Island are not “anecdotal” (Ibid). The follow-up testing at 18QU1047 funded by the non-capital grant indicate additional in-situ archaeological remains occur immediately inland from the shoreline. Even with the current data, we do not know the inland extent of the two surviving archaeological sites currently located on Parsons Island. Because of the ongoing effects of coastal erosion, we may be seeing the beginning, the middle, or the tail-end of these two sites. Most importantly, additional investigations of Parsons Island could be conducted. With our objective to assist the landowners of Parsons Island, the research outlined in this monograph should augment the urgency and the immediacy for shoreline stabilization. Archaeological resources; regardless of their significance, have typically been viewed as an obstacle (see Lowery 2007) by landowners. In short, the generous support and access afforded by the landowners of Parsons Island should illustrate to others that collaborations between scholars and landowners can result in mutual objectives; i.e., site preservation via shoreline stabilization. 
In sum, the data presented in this monograph should illustrate to landowners, academicians, cultural resource managers, members of the interested public, and outside scholars about the unique and somewhat discouraging coastal erosion scenarios noted along a small portion (see Figure 1.5) of the Chesapeake Bay’s 11,684 linear miles (18,804 km) of shoreline. The land and archaeological site loss noted at Parsons Island (see Figure 1.5) is common along raw exposed shorelines throughout the region. With respect to both site loss and coastal erosion in the Middle Atlantic region, I once stated in a professional lecture that you are “not in Kansas anymore”. 
Hopefully, the work synthesized in this monograph will help the public to better understand the daunting issues surrounding coastal erosion and archaeological site loss in the Chesapeake Bay area. Between 1992 and 2018 along solely a ~360-meter (~1180 feet) section of Parsons Island’s southwestern margin, over 55,000 cubic meters (~72,162 cubic yards) of sediment eroded into the Chesapeake Bay. During this twenty-six-year period, the amount of sediment eroded and sieved by the actions of both water and waves would fill over 5,000 commercial-sized dump trucks. In 2015, the State Archaeologist of Virginia asked me, “Why is it you find so many interesting archaeological remains along shorelines?” Note that Virginia has 7,213 linear miles (11,608 km) of shoreline. The answer to this question is simple. I doubt that there has ever been a single professional archaeological excavation in North America where so much sediment has been extracted and sieved for archaeological remains (i.e., artifacts) over such a short period of time. Remarkably, the rate of erosion and land loss noted at Parsons Island is not uncommon along vast sections of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. It is fascinating that some professional archaeologists in the region (see Custer 2018) do not recognize coastal erosion as the principal variable resulting in increased probability for artifact discovery. Hopefully, this monograph will provide some guidance and rectify many of the crucial misunderstandings about the region.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on the Archaeology of Early Medieval Europe.

Season 4 is on Latest Research on the Peopling of North America.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear season 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

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Dr. Michael Faught, Vice President, Treasurer, Archaeological Research Cooperative
Courtesy Appointments, University of Arizona and University of Florida 

Senior Advisor SEARCH Inc.

http://www.mfaught.org/

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael-Faught

 

Dr. Charlotte D. Pevny, Project Manager, SEARCH Inc.

https://www.searchinc.com/pages/staff-charlotte-d-pevny

 

Publication:

Michael K. Faught & Charlotte Donald Pevny 2019. 'Pre-Clovis to the Early Archaic: Human Presence, Expansion, and Settlement in Florida over Four Millennia', PALEOAMERICA 5(1) 73-87.

In this article, we review evidence for the initial presence, later expansion, and subsequent settling in of first Floridians during times when climate change and sea level rise decreased the amount of habitable land. We present projectile-point and formal-tool sequences and estimated chronologies that describe Florida’s: (1) pre-Clovis presence (exploration); (2) Clovis presence focused on river channels, springs, chert resources, and possibly megafauna (colonization); (3) continuation and proliferation of Clovis-related, but post-megafauna late Paleoindian lanceolate point makers that
remained focused on river channels, springs, and chert (expansion); (4) transition to side- and corner-notched points and a plethora of formal tools, along with significant population increase and landscape use occurring away from waterways (settlement); and (5) possible population decline or abandonment, or both, by 10,000 calendar years ago or soon thereafter.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on the Archaeology of Early Medieval Europe.

Season 4 is on Latest Research on the Peopling of North America.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear season 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

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Dr. Lorena Becerra-Valdivia, School of Archaeology, Oxford University

https://www.arch.ox.ac.uk/people/dr-lorena-becerra-valdivia#/

 

Professor Tom Higham, Director, Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, School of Archaeology, Oxford University

https://www.arch.ox.ac.uk/people/higham-tom#/

 

Publications:

Lorena Becerra-Valdivia & Thomas Higham 2020.  ‘The timing and effect of the earliest human arrivals in North America’, Nature 584.

The peopling of the Americas marks a major expansion of humans across the planet. However, questions regarding the timing and mechanisms of this dispersal remain, and the previously accepted model (termed ‘Clovis-first’)—suggesting that the first inhabitants of the Americas were linked with the Clovis tradition, a complex marked by distinctive fluted lithic points1—has been effectively refuted. Here we analyse chronometric data from 42 North American and Beringian archaeological sites using a Bayesian age modelling approach, and use the resulting chronological framework to elucidate spatiotemporal patterns of human dispersal. We then integrate these patterns with the available genetic and climatic evidence. The data obtained show that humans were probably present before, during and immediately after the Last Glacial Maximum (about 26.5–19 thousand years ago)2,3 but that more widespread occupation began during a period of abrupt warming, Greenland Interstadial 1 (about 14.7–12.9 thousand years before ad 2000)4. We also identify the near-synchronous commencement of Beringian, Clovis and Western Stemmed cultural traditions, and an overlap of each with the last dates for the appearance of 18 now-extinct faunal genera. Our analysis suggests that the widespread expansion of humans through North America was a key factor in the extinction of large terrestrial mammals.

 

Higham, T, Douka, K, Wood, R, Ramsey, CB, Brock, F, Basell, L, Camps, M, Arrizabalaga, A, Baena, J, Barroso-Ruíz, C, Bergman, C, Boitard, C, et al 2014. 'The timing and spatiotemporal patterning of Neanderthal disappearance', Nature: 512(7514) pp.306 - 309

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on the Archaeology of Early Medieval Europe.

Season 4 is on Latest Research on the Peopling of North America.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear season 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

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Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

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Emeritus Prof. Chris Ellis, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Western Ontario.

https://anthropology.uwo.ca/people/faculty/chris_ellis.html

Dr. Jonathan Lothrop, Curator of Archaeology, New York State Museum.

http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/research-collections/archaeology/native-american-archaeology/dr-jonathan-lothrop

 

Publication:

Christopher J. Ellis and Jonathan C. Lothrop. 2019. "Early Fluted-biface Variation in Glaciated Northeastern North America", PaleoAmerica 5(2): 121-131.

Most researchers argue that archaeological evidence for the Clovis technological complex, although documented across most of unglaciated North America, is absent in the glaciated Northeast, suggesting that early Paleoindian populations in the latter region were descendent from early Native American peoples associated with Clovis technology. If so, what are the earliest flutedbiface forms in glaciated northeastern North America? To refine developmental and relative chronological relationships of early Paleoindian fluted bifaces in the region, we examine fluted-biface-reduction sequences at the Rogers (Ontario) and West Athens Hill (WAH) (New York) sites, and (2) compare fluted-point samples from early Paleoindian sites in the Northeast and vicinity. For Rogers and WAH, our results document variable frequencies of overshot and overface flaking during fluted-point manufacture – features linked elsewhere to Clovis biface reduction. In addition, analyses identify several early Paleoindian fluted-point samples in the Northeast that bear similarities to Clovis points but differ from, and therefore likely predate Gainey and Gainey-related early Paleoindian point forms in the glaciated Northeast.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on the Archaeology of Early Medieval Europe.

Season 4 is on Latest Research on the Peopling of North America.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear season 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

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Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

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Prof. Jack Ives, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Alberta.

https://apps.ualberta.ca/directory/person/jives

Dr. Gabriel Yanicki, Curator of Western Archaeology, Canadian Museum of History. 

https://www.historymuseum.ca/learn/research/

Assoc. Prof. Kisha Supernant, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Alberta.

https://sites.ualberta.ca/~supernan/

Courtney Lakevold, Archaeological Information Coordinator, Archaeological Survey, Historic Resources Management Branch, Alberta Culture and Tourism.

https://ca.linkedin.com/in/courtney-lakevold-13330393

 

Publications:

John W. Ives, Gabriel Yanicki, Kisha Supernant & Courtney Lakevold (2019) Confluences: Fluted Points in the Ice-Free Corridor, PaleoAmerica, 5:2, 143-156, DOI: 10.1080/20555563.2019.1600136

We undertake an expanded analysis of the Western Canadian Fluted Points database. Given clear
evidence of biotic habitability along the entire Corridor by 13,000 years ago, fluted point spatial
clusters likely reflect both Clovis contemporaneous and later fluted point instances. Points were
overwhelmingly fashioned on local toolstones, featuring a bimodal length distribution (larger,
relatively unaltered fluted points versus reworked, smaller fluted points at the end of their use
life), mainly found in dispersed landscape settings rather than major kills or campsites. The
temporal cline from older Clovis forms south of the ice masses to younger fluted points in
Alaska suggests fluted point makers traversing the Corridor eventually met populations bearing
eastern Beringian traditions. Corridor fluted point morphologies may indicate the degree to
which diffusion or demic expansion mediated north-south interactions: deeper bases, parallel
sides and multiple basal thinning flakes reflect intermediate forms similar to Younger Dryas-aged
Alaskan fluted points.

John W. (Jack) Ives. 2015. 'Kinship, Demography, and Paleoindian Modes of Colonization:
Some Western Canadian Perspectives' in Michael David Frachetti & Robert N. Spengler III (eds.) Mobility and Ancient Society in Asia and the Americas: Proceedings of the Second International Conference on “Great Migrations” Held at Columbia University in December 1-2, 2011. Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

Unlike many avenues of social science enquiry, the study of variability in human kinship has been
almost uniquely the domain of anthropologists. Kinship provided core subject matter for more than a
century of anthropological thought (Trautmann 2001 ), and until quite recently, important theoretical
trends in anthropology were founded with signifi cant reference to kinship studies. Despite its centrality
as anthropological subject matter, detecting organizing features connected with kinship in archaeological
records or using kin structures in understanding the past have been subsidiary activities in
anthropological archaeology.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on the Archaeology of Early Medieval Europe.

Season 4 is on Latest Research on the Peopling of North America.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear season 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Linda Fibiger, School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh.

https://www.ed.ac.uk/history-classics-archaeology/about-us/staff-profiles/profile_tab1_academic.php?uun=lfibiger

 

Publications:

Fibiger, L. 2018. The past as a foreign country: Bioarchaeologial perspectives on Pinker's "Prehistoric Anarchy". Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques 44(1), 6-16.  https://doi.org/10.3167/hrrh.2018.440103

Steven Pinker’s thesis on the decline of violence since prehistory has resulted in
many popular and scholarly debates on the topic that have ranged—at times even raged—
across the disciplinary spectrum of evolution, psychology, philosophy, biology, history, and
beyond. Those disciplines that made the most substantial contribution to the empirical
data underpinning Pinker’s notion of a more violent prehistoric past, namely, archaeology
and bioarchaeology/physical anthropology, have not featured as prominently in these discussions
as may be expected. This article will focus on some of the issues resulting from
Pinker’s oversimplifi ed cross-disciplinary use of bioarchaeological data sets in support of
his linear model of the past, a model that, incidentally, has yet to be incorporated into current
accounts of violent practices in prehistory.

Dyer, M. & Fibiger, L. 2017. Understanding blunt force trauma and violence in Neolithic Europe: The first experiments using a skin-skull-brain model and the Thames Beater. Antiquity 91 (360), 1515-1528. https://doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2017.189

The difficulty in identifying acts of intentional injury in the past has limited the
extent to which archaeologists have been able to discuss the nature of interpersonal violence
in prehistory. Experimental replication of cranial trauma has proved particularly
problematic due to the lack of test analogues that are sufficiently comparable to the human
skull. A new material now overcomes this issue, and for the first time allows accurate
insight into the effects of different weapons and different blows in inflicting cranial
injury; in this case, blunt force trauma caused using a replica of the ‘Thames Beater’
Neolithic wooden club.

Downing, M. & Fibiger, L. 2017. An experimental investigation of sharp force skeletal trauma with replica Bronze Age weapons. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports 11, 546-554. https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2016.12.034

Skeletal sharp force trauma provides direct evidence for the use of bladedweapons against humans. As such, it is
an important source of evidence for examining the prevalence of violence and weapon use in the past. The primary
aims of this study are to provide experimental evidence for the efficacy of Bronze Ageweapons against skeletal
tissue and to test the applicability of existing criteria for sharp force trauma analysis to Bronze Age skeletal
material. To that end, three Bronze Ageweapons - a dirk, flanged axe andWilburton sword - were used to strike
four Synbone spheres (‘crania’) and two cylinders (‘long bones’). Subsequent damage to the weapons and
Synbonewas analyzed usingmacroscopic andmicroscopic methods including digital photography, three-dimensional
digital modelling, and metric analysis. The results of the study suggest theWilburton sword and flanged
axe could be effective weapons in combat and existing methods for cutmark analysis are generally applicable
to injuries createdwith Bronze Ageweaponswhen taking into account the size of the weapons. Sword (slashing)
and axe (chopping) trauma can be distinguished on the artificial bone material based on the degree of wastage
and fracturing. Further research is needed to develop criteria for distinguishing sword and dirk trauma as
sword trauma was not distinguishable from knife weapon classes. Additionally, Synbone may not be an ideal
skeletal tissue analogue in sharp force trauma research as it does not record the microscopic striations created
by a blade passing through bone.

 

Angela Boyle, Burial Archaeologist, Professional Archaeological & Osteoarchaeological Services.

https://www.burial-archaeologist.co.uk/

 

Thesis:

Boyle, A. 2021. 'Cowboys and Indians? A Biocultural Study of Violence And Conflict In South-East Scotland C AD 400 to C AD 800'. School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh.

This thesis considers the skeletal evidence for violence in south-east Scotland during the early medieval period and includes analysis of human remains not previously examined alongside biomolecular analyses of selected skeletons. South-east Scotland experienced several dramatic events in this period, including the end of Roman rule, the Anglian invasion and the commencement of Viking attacks. The traditional view held by some archaeologists in the relatively recent past was that the anglicisation of post-Roman Britain was akin to Hollywood cowboys and Indians and that the Anglo-Saxon conquest was a form of ethnic cleansing. The primary aim of this research was to utilise bioarchaeological data alongside other strands of evidence, such as new radiocarbon dates, isotope and DNA analysis alongside XRF and SEM analysis of injuries, to explore if the period was conflict-ridden or not. Other avenues of research incorporated into this thesis include burial practice, the evidence for weaponry and the iconography of carved stones. Human remains provide the most direct evidence of violence in the past yet regional studies remain relatively uncommon, particularly in Scotland. This is the first major synthesis of human remains in south-east Scotland and includes the first bioarchaeological analysis of several important assemblages from the region, ie. Lundin Links, Lasswade and the recently rediscovered mass burial from the Roman fort at Cramond. Osteological analysis of more than 300 skeletons, many of which were excavated in the 19th and first half of the 20th century, has demonstrated a general absence of evidence for violence except for notable concentrations in and around the Firth of Forth. In this region, significant advances in the bioarchaeology of trauma in recent years have facilitated the identification of important cases of peri-mortem trauma previously unrecorded. In addition, isotope analysis has provided important data on origins and mobility while DNA analysis has proved useful in confirming the sex of poorly preserved adult skeletons. This has important implications for our understanding of the relationships between Angles, Britons and Picts, the nature of conflict in the area and for political and social interaction both within and on the fringes of the study area. Conclusions have been reached on the nature, function and impact of violence more generally. It seems likely that the threat of violence within the region acted as a sufficient deterrent most of the time and that the main focus of aggressive action was on the Pictish frontier.

 

Elin Ahlin Sundman, Department of Archaeology, University of Iceland.

https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Elin-Ahlin-Sundman-2143977164

Dr. Anna Kjellström, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University.

https://www.su.se/profiles/ankje-1.184661

 

Publication:

Sundman, E.A. & Kjellström, A. 2020. 'Medieval Masculinities and Violence: Weapon-Related Trauma in Skeletal
Assemblages from Two Religious Houses in Iceland and Sweden. European Journal of Archaeology 23 (4) 2020, 567–584.

Previous research has shown that physical violence had a normative presence in medieval Nordic societies.
In this study, weapon-related trauma (WRT) was examined in human skeletal assemblages from
two religious houses, Skriðuklaustur in Iceland, and Västerås in Sweden. The aims were to identify
patterns of WRT and to relate these to the masculinities of different groups of men. Violence was a
prominent component of identity among lay men, especially for men with warrior experience. The use of
violence was more problematic among clerics. The hypothesis that these notions of ideal masculine behaviour
would affect the ways in which masculinities were enacted and would be reflected in the patterns of
WRT was borne out by the results of this study. No WRT was identified among the canons and lay
brothers in Skriðuklaustur, but it was present in about thirty per cent of the males interpreted as
belonging to the lay elite buried in the northern part of the church at Västerås.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Season 4 is on Latest Research on the Peopling of North America.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

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https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Hon. Assoc. Prof. Sue Harrington, Institute of Archaeology, University College London.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/people/honorary/susan-harrington-honorary-associate-professor

Dr. Stuart Brookes, Institute of Archaeology, University College London.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/people/stuart-brookes-leverhulme-trust-senior-research-associate

Prof. Sarah Semple, Durham University

https://www.dur.ac.uk/research/directory/staff/?mode=staff&id=4505

Assoc. Prof. Andrew Millard, Durham University

https://www.dur.ac.uk/research/directory/staff/?mode=staff&id=160

 

Publication:

Harrington, S., Brookes, S., Semple, S., & Millard, A. 2020. 'Theatres of Closure: Process and Performance in Inhumation Burial Rites in Early Medieval Britain', Cambridge Archaeological Journal 30:3, 389–412.

Inhumation burials are recorded in Britain and Europe during excavations in a
standardized way, especially graves of early medieval date. Just a limited number of
attributes are usually foregrounded and these mainly concern skeletal identification, the
grave plan and, when a burial is furnished, a list of objects, particularly metalwork, as
well as occasional reference to burial structures, if present. In this paper, we argue that
concealed within these recorded details are attributes that often receive little attention,
but which can provide evidence for community investment in the individual funerary
rite. These include grave orientation, grave morphology, the body position and the
empty spaces in the grave, as well as categories of material culture. We argue here that
these factors enable us to define communal burial profiles and can facilitate the
identification of group perceptions and actions in dealing with death. By capitalizing
on these additional aspects of funerary ritual, archaeologists can move away from a
general dependency on well-furnished burials as the main stepping-off point for
discussion of social and cultural issues. This has particular relevance for regions where
unfurnished burial rites are the norm and where furnished rites do not rely on a
wealth of metalwork.

 

Dr. Clare Rainsford, Freelance Consultant Archaeologist

https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Clare-Rainsford-2066658681

 

Publication:

Clare Rainsford (2021) One hoof in the grave? Animal remains as inhumation grave goods in early medieval eastern England, Archaeological Journal, 178:1, 146-165, DOI: 10.1080/00665983.2020.1864613
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/00665983.2020.1864613

Animal remains placed into inhumation graves in 5th-7th century
England have been recorded for many years, but for reasons
related both to the development of the discipline and the sparse
nature of the evidence, there has been little systematic study of
these remains. The evidence for animal remains in inhumation
burials across five eastern UK counties (Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex,
Cambridgeshire, Lincolnshire) is reviewed, and results from three
cemeteries – Oakington, Cambridgeshire; Lakenheath, Suffolk; and
Castledyke South, Lincolnshire – are discussed in detail. A broadly
consistent animal cosmology is indicated, which may extend
across the UK, but the practices in which animals are incorporated
as grave goods are seen to vary between cemeteries and even on
an intra-cemetery or family basis. This may have implications for
the analysis of animal remains in early Anglo-Saxon cremation
cemeteries, where the much larger numbers of burials and animal
pyre goods have resisted easy interpretation.

 

Femke Lippok, Leiden University.

https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/en/staffmembers/femke-lippok#tab-1

 

Publication:

Femke Eline Lippok (2020) The pyre and the grave: early medieval cremation burials in the Netherlands, the German Rhineland and Belgium, World Archaeology, 52:1, 147-162, DOI: 10.1080/00438243.2020.1769297
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/00438243.2020.1769297

This paper problematizes grand-narrative thinking in continental, north western
European early medieval (450–800 CE) burial archaeology. Using the existing
research history and current debate on early medieval cremation burials,
I demonstrate that European early medieval burial archaeology has focused on
explaining the development of the furnished inhumation burial since the discipline’s
conception. This has led to a misrepresentation of the diversity of early
medieval burial practices and reinforced broad, unsatisfactory explanatory models.
By including other burial types, like cremation burials, the overall model is
changed in terms of what early medieval burial practices comprised, enabling
a better understanding of the development of early medieval society.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

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Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

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Victoria Ziegler, Institute of Archaeology, University College London.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/people/research-students/victoria-ziegler

PhD Thesis: A study of urban trans-location in early medieval England: occupation identities in Saxon London 770-1020

 

Publication:

Victoria Ziegler (2019) 'From wic to burh: a new approach to the question of the development of Early Medieval London', Archaeological Journal, 176:2, 336-368, DOI:
10.1080/00665983.2019.1573553
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/00665983.2019.1573553

During the ninth century the focus of occupation in Saxon London
shifted eastwards from the Covent Garden area back to the former
Roman city of Londinium. Combining detailed case studies with
the results of correspondence analysis, this paper critically compares
archaeological features and assemblages at sites dated c. AD
770 to c. AD 850 in Middle Saxon Lundenwic with sites dated c. AD
850 to c. AD 950 in Late Saxon Lundenburh. Differences in the
archaeology of the two settlements are discussed. These distinctions
reveal specific areas of discontinuity that strongly support
current models of a hiatus between the decline of Lundenwic and
renewed activity in Lundenburh.

 

Prof. Helena Hamerow, School of Archaeology, University of Oxford.

https://www.arch.ox.ac.uk/people/hamerow-helena#/

 

Publication:

HAMEROW, H. BOGAARD, A. CHARLES, M. FORSTER, E. HOLMES, M,. MCKERRACHER, M. NEIL, S. BRONK RAMSEY, C. STROUD, E. & THOMAS, R. 2020. ‘An Integrated Bioarchaeological Approach to the Medieval ‘Agricultural Revolution’: A Case Study from Stafford, England, c. AD 800–1200’, European Journal of Archaeology 23 (4), 585–609.

In much of Europe, the advent of low-input cereal farming regimes between c. AD 800 and 1200 enabled
landowners—lords—to amass wealth by greatly expanding the amount of land under cultivation and
exploiting the labour of others. Scientific analysis of plant remains and animal bones from archaeological
contexts is generating the first direct evidence for the development of such low-input regimes. This article
outlines the methods used by the FeedSax project to resolve key questions regarding the ‘cerealization’ of
the medieval countryside and presents preliminary results using the town of Stafford as a worked example.
These indicate an increase in the scale of cultivation in the Mid-Saxon period, while the Late Saxon
period saw a shift to a low-input cultivation regime and probably an expansion onto heavier soils. Crop
rotation appears to have been practised from at least the mid-tenth century.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

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https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

 

Aina Heen Pettersen, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology

https://www.ntnu.edu/employees/aina.pettersen

PhD Thesis: Farin Vestir: Perspectives on the chronology, biography and mutability of Insular objects in Viking-Age Norway (c. AD 770/800-950).

 

Publication:

Pettersen, Aina Margrethe Heen 2019. The Earliest Wave of Viking Activity? The Norwegian Evidence Revisited. European Journal of Archaeology 22 (4), 523–541

This article discusses the chronology and nature of the earliest Viking activity, based on a group of early
burials from Norway containing Insular metalwork. By focusing on the geographical distribution of this
material and applying the concept of locational and social knowledge, the importance of establishing
cognitive landscapes to facilitate the Viking expansion is highlighted. It is argued that the first recorded
Viking attacks were only possible after a phase in which Norse seafarers had acquired the necessarily
level of a priori environmental knowledge needed to move in new seascapes and coastal environments.
This interaction model opens the possibility that some of the early Insular finds from Norway may
represent pre-Lindisfarne exploration voyages, carried out by seafarers along the sailing route of
Nordvegr.

 

 

Andreas Hennius, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, Sweden.

https://www.arkeologi.uu.se/staff/Presentations/andreas-hennius_en/

Dr. John Ljungkvist, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, Sweden.

https://www.arkeologi.uu.se/staff/Presentations/john-ljungkvist-en/

 

Publication:

Hennius. A, Gustavsson, R. Ljungkvist, J. & Spindler, L. 2018. Whalebone Gaming Pieces: Aspects of Marine Mammal Exploitation in Vendel and Viking Age Scandinavia. European Journal of Archaeology 21 (4), 612–631.

Discussions of pre-Viking trade and production have for many decades focused on products made of
precious metals, glass and, to some degree, iron. This is hardly surprising considering the difficulties in
finding and provenancing products made of organic matter. In this article we examine gaming pieces
made from bone and antler, which are not unusual in Scandinavian burials in the Vendel and Viking
period (c. AD 550–1050). A special emphasis is placed on whalebone pieces that appear to dominate
after around AD 550, signalling a large-scale production and exploitation of North Atlantic whale products.
In combination with other goods such as bear furs, birds of prey, and an increased iron and tar
production, whalebone products are part of an intensified large-scale outland exploitation and indicate
strong, pre-urban trading routes across Scandinavia and Europe some 200 years before the Viking
period and well before the age of the emporia.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

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Prof. Duncan Sayer, University of Central Lancashire

https://www.uclan.ac.uk/staff_profiles/dr_duncan_sayer.php

http://www.ribchesterrevisted.uk/

 

Open Access Publication:

Sayer, D. 2020. Early Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries: Kinship, Community and Identity. Manchester University Press.

https://www.manchesteropenhive.com/view/9781526153845/9781526153845.xml

Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries are well-known because of their rich grave goods, but this wealth can obscure their importance as local phenomena and the product of pluralistic multi-generational communities. This book explores over one hundred early Anglo-Saxon and some Merovingian cemeteries and aims to understand them using a multi-dimensional methodology. The performance of mortuary drama was a physical communication and so needed syntax and semantics. This local knowledge was used to negotiate the arrangement of cemetery spaces and to construct the stories that were told within them. For some families the emphasis of a mortuary ritual was on reinforcing and reproducing family narratives, but this was only one technique used to arrange cemetery space. This book offers an alternative way to explore the horizontal organisation of cemeteries from a holistic perspective. Each chapter builds on the last, using visual aesthetics, leitmotifs, spatial statistics, grave orientation, density of burial, mortuary ritual, grave goods, grave robbing, barrows, integral structures, skeletal trauma, stature, gender and age to build a detailed picture of complex mortuary spaces. This approach places community at the forefront of interpretation because people used and reused cemetery spaces and these people chose to emphasise different characteristics of the deceased because of their own attitudes, lifeways and lived experiences. This book will appeal to scholars of Anglo-Saxon studies and will also be of value to archaeologists interested in mortuary spaces, communities and social differentiation because it proposes a way to move beyond grave goods in the discussion of complex social identities. 

eISBN: 9781526153845
Online Publication Date: 03 Dec 2020

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

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Dr. Duncan W. Wright, Newcastle University.

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/hca/people/profile/duncanwright.html

 

Publication:

Duncan W Wright (2019) Crafters of Kingship: Smiths, Elite Power, and Gender in Early Medieval Europe, Medieval Archaeology, 63:2, 271-297, DOI: 10.1080/00766097.2019.1670922

IN THE EARLIEST CENTURIES of the Middle Ages, skilled metalsmiths were greatly valued by
cult leaders who required impressive objects to maintain social links and the loyalty of their retainers.
Despite their clear importance, smiths were peripheral characters operating on the fringes of elite communities.
Such treatment may reflect an attempt to limit the influence of metalworkers, whose craft was seen
as supernatural and who themselves were probably spiritual figureheads; archaeological evidence associates
smiths and their tools in symbolic processes of creation and destruction, not only of objects but also
of buildings and monuments. The Church clearly appropriated these indigenous practices, although conversion
eventually saw the pre-eminence of the sacred smith and their practice wane. Anthropological
study provides numerous comparators for skilled crafters acting as supernatural leaders, and also suggests
that as part of their marginal identity, smiths may have been perceived as a distinct gender.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Andy Seaman, Canterbury Christ Church University.

https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-and-humanities/school-of-humanities/Staff/Profile.aspx?staff=caf3b7084f35e566

 

Leo Sucharyna Thomas, University of Ediburgh.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Leo_Sucharyna_Thomas

 

Publication:

ANDY SEAMAN AND LEO SUCHARYNA THOMAS. 'Hillforts and Power in the British Post-Roman West: A GIS Analysis of Dinas Powys', European Journal of Archaeology 23 (4) 2020, 547–566,  

The (re)occupation of hillforts was a distinctive feature of post-Roman Europe in the fifth to seventh
centuries AD. In western and northern Britain, hillforts are interpreted as power centres associated with
militarized elites, but research has paid less attention to their landscape context, hence we know little
about the factors that influenced their siting and how this facilitated elite power. Geographic
Information Systems (GIS) provide opportunities for landscape research, but are constrained by limitations
of source data and the difficulty of defining appropriate parameters for analysis. This article presents
a new methodology that combines data processing and analytical functions in GIS with techniques
and principles drawn from ‘traditional’ landscape archaeology. A case study, focused on Dinas Powys,
suggests that the strategic siting of this hillfort facilitated control over the landscape and has wider
implications for our understanding of patterns of power in post-Roman Britain.
Keywords: hillforts, power, post-Roman Britain, GIS, viewsheds, least-cost paths

 

Dr. Michelle Comber, University of Ireland Galway.

https://www.nuigalway.ie/our-research/people/geography-and-archaeology/michellecomber/#

 

Publication:

Michelle Comber (2019) Square Ringforts? A Contribution to the Identification of ‘Ringfort’ Types, Medieval Archaeology 63:1, 128-153,  

ONGOING DISCUSSIONS of the monuments commonly referred to as ‘ ringforts’ in Ireland include
the definition and investigation of specific types of these enclosures. Rectilinear, or subsquare, enclosures
comprise one such type, with examples identifiable in the well-preserved archaeological landscape of the
Burren (Co Clare) in western Ireland. It is also possible to extend such identification into the counties of
the western seaboard, from Co Cork in the south to Co Donegal in the north. Questions of chronology,
function, status, and cultural identity are addressed. Although a measure of variation may exist within
the category of rectilinear enclosures, there is some uniformity of morphology and chronology and, perhaps, function.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Emma Brownlee, Girton College, Cambridge.

https://cambridge.academia.edu/EmmaBrownlee

 

Publications:

Emma Brownlee. (2020) 'The Dead and their Possessions: The Declining Agency of the Cadaver in Early Medieval Europe', European Journal of Archaeology 23 (3) 2020, 406–427.

Brownlee, E. Connectivity and Funerary Change in Early Medieval Europe. Antiquity: a quarterly review of archaeology https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.51984.
 
Between the sixth and eighth centuries AD, the practice of furnished burial was widely abandoned in
favour of a much more standardized, unfurnished rite. This article examines that transition by considering
the personhood and agency of the corpse, the different ways bonds of possession can form between
people and objects, and what happens to those bonds at death. By analysing changing grave good use
across western Europe, combined with an in-depth analysis of the Alamannic cemetery of Pleidelsheim,
and historical evidence for perceptions of the corpse, the author argues that the change in grave good use
marks a fundamental change in the perception of corpses.
Keywords: early medieval, personhood, cadaver, funerary practices, grave goods, possession.
 
 
Dr. Michèle Hayeur Smith, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University.
 
Kevin Philbrook Smith, Deputy Director and Chief Curator, Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology, Brown University.
 
Prof. Karin M. Frei, National Museum of Denmark.
 
Publications:

MICHÈLE HAYEUR SMITH, KEVIN P SMITH & KARIN M FREI (2019). ‘Tangled up in Blue’: The Death, Dress and Identity of an Early Viking-Age Female Settler from Ketilsstaðir, Iceland, Medieval Archaeology, 63:1, 95-127, 

IN 1938, a woman’s burial was uncovered by road builders at Ketilsstaðir in north-eastern Iceland.
Recently, her physical remains and associated funerary goods were re-examined by an international, interdisciplinary
team and formed the basis for an exhibition at the National Museum of Iceland in 2015.
This paper focuses on the items of dress that accompanied the woman in order to gain insights into the
ways her cultural identity was expressed at the time of her death. Here we explore the roles played by
material culture in signaling her identity, and the technologies and trade networks through which she was
connected, visually, to Scandinavia, the British Isles, and the Viking world at large.

 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

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Pamela Chauvel, University of Sydney.

https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Pamela-Chauvel-2169341354

 

Dr. James L. Flexner, University of Sydney. 

https://www.sydney.edu.au/arts/about/our-people/academic-staff/james-flexner.html

 

Publication:

Chauvel, P., Flexner, J. (2020). Mapping Difference in the "Uniform" Workers' cottages of Maria Island, Tasmania. International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 24(4), 902-919. [More Information]

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, company towns often provided
housing for workers within a system of benevolent paternalism. This paper examines a
set of workers’ cottages known as “the Twelve Apostles” on Maria Island, Tasmania.
The archaeology reveals differences between the standardized, company-built houses,
providing evidence that the residents’ responses often varied in ways that were not
officially expected or sanctioned by the company. People individualized their houses in
ways that reflect their everyday routines and rituals, and demonstrate how they made these houses into homes.
Keywords Maria Island . Tasmania . Household archaeology. Capitalism. Paternalism.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dave Johnston, Australian Indigenous Archaeologists' Association

https://www.anu.edu.au/alumni/our-alumni/spotlight/david-johnston

https://www.foxtel.com.au/whats-on/foxtel-insider/latest-news/coast-australia-s4.html

When David Johnston was a boy, he keenly explored the caves near his home, leading his mother to suggest he might become an archaeologist. Later, he became one of the first Indigenous Australians to gain a degree in archaeology, graduating from ANU with Honours and completing a Master degree in London.

Conserving the nation's Aboriginal heritage is Dave's passion. As a consultant archaeologist for 27 years, he has worked on more than 2,000 heritage projects across eastern Australia from Cape York to Point Nepean.

In 2014, he was awarded the Sharon Sullivan National Heritage award for his outstanding contribution to the Indigenous heritage environment and his continuing influence on practice.

Dave has had a remarkable career and is recognised as a world leader in the field of Australian Indigenous archaeology.

He has made important contributions to the field and its development at Australian universities as well as working to ensure an Indigenous perspective and voice in the study and teaching of Australian archaeology.

His contributions have been recognised internationally. He was involved in the development of a code of ethics for the World Archaeological Congress and also drove the adoption of a code of ethics by the Australian Archaeological Association.

He was instrumental in the development of the Australian Government's guidelines for Indigenous heritage and was a member of the AIATSIS Research Ethics Committee that developed the Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies.

Dave has been active at ANU since he graduated, most recently being the Founding Chair of the ANU Indigenous Alumni Network, which he and Indigenous Alumni members established in 2016.

He delivers annual guest lectures and co-ordinates two to three local community-run archaeological site visits a year for the Archaeology School as well as guest lecturing for two other ANU schools.

He has been a board member of the University's Aboriginal History Journal for 19 years and has been a long-time supporter of the Tjabal Centre, being one of its Foundation students.

 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

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https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Prof. Eleanor Casella, University of Tasmania

https://www.utas.edu.au/humanities#history-and-classics

https://www.utas.edu.au/arts-law-education/study/convict-archaeology 

https://utas.academia.edu/EleanorCasella

 

Publications:

Casella, E. C. 2002. Archaeology of the Ross Female Factory: Female Incarceration in Van Diemen's Land, Australia. Launceston, Tasmania : Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery.

Casella, E. C. 2016. 'Horizons beyond the Perimeter Wall: Relational Materiality, Institutional Confinement, and the Archaeology of Being Global', Historical Archaeology 50(3) 127-143.

As historical archaeologists, how might we begin to unpick the complex material webs of trades, migrations, and technologies that constitute globalization? How should we simultaneously understand the local and transnational meanings of our study sites? Through examples based around the 19th-century transportation of British felons to the Australian penal colonies, this article considers how recent work in relational theory offers fresh directions for exploring how the process of “being global” enmeshes humans, artifacts, and landscapes into ever-wider meshworks of connection and significance. It suggests that by traveling along the dynamic awful lines of globalization from the inside out, we archaeologists can consider not only what alternatives could have been, but what might be in our future.

 

Dr. Peta Longhurst, University of Sydney Alumna.

https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Peta-Longhurst-2112990062 

 

Publications:

Longhurst, P. 2018. 'Contagious objects: artefacts of disease transmission and control at North Head Quarantine Station, Australia', World Archaeology, 50:3, 512-529.

https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/17906 

From 1828 to 1984, North Head Quarantine Station was the first port of call
for many immigrants seeking a new life in Australia. The institution was
intended to confine disease, via the bodies and objects that conveyed it,
and prevent it from spreading throughout the Sydney populace. Despite
being a public health institution, an initial functional analysis found that
only a small subset of artefacts associated with the site were medical in
nature. This article draws on the assemblage of North Head to consider
how the material culture of quarantine extends beyond medical instruments.
By re-evaluating the assemblage through a disease-centred, ‘epidemiological’
lens, the author demonstrates how disease permeates throughout the quarantine
assemblage, enmeshing artefacts, bodies and contagions within a
complex web of relations.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Prof. Jo McDonald,

Director of the Centre for Rock Art Studies & Management;

Rio Tinto Chair in Rock Art Studies, University of Western Australia. 

https://research-repository.uwa.edu.au/en/persons/jo-mcdonald 

https://www.crarm.uwa.edu.au/research

Publications:

https://www.crarm.uwa.edu.au/murujuga-dreaming

The Murujuga: Dynamics of the Dreaming project aims to provide research support for the protection and understanding of the world’s largest rock art galleries of Murujuga (the Burrup Peninsula) and the Dampier Archipelago.

 

Dr. Sally K. May, 

Senior Research Fellow with the Place, Evolution and Rock Art Heritage Unit (PERAHU) at Griffith University, Australia.

https://experts.griffith.edu.au/9542-sally-k-may

 

Publications:

May, S. K., Wright, D., Domingo Sanz, I., Goldhahn, J. & Maralngurra, G. In press. ‘The Buffaroo: a ‘first-sight’ depiction of introduced buffalo in the rock art of western Arnhem Land, Australia. Rock Art Research.

May, S.K., Taçon, P.S.C., Jalandoni, A., Goldhahn, A., Wesley, D., Tsang, R. & Mangiru, K. In press. The re-emergence of nganaparru (water buffalo) into western Arnhem Land life, landscape and rock art’.  Antiquity.

May, S.K., Rademaker, L. Nadjamerrek, D. & Narndal Gumurdul, J. 2020. The Bible in Buffalo Country: Oenpelli Mission 1925-1931. Canberra, ANU Press. 

Frieman, C.J. & May, S.K. 2019. ‘Navigating Contact: Tradition and Innovation in Australian Contact Rock Art’. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 17.

The introduction of new animals into hunter-gatherer societies worldwide enacted a variety of responses. In many places, such animals became part of creative artistic practices including rock art. This paper explores the role of rock art in western Arnhem Land, Australia, in helping to mediate changes in Indigenous society in the 19th century. Merging an archaeological analysis with anthropological literature we explore both an etic and emic perspective on the “introduction” or “re-emergence” of water buffalo into Aboriginal life and culture. In the past, some outsiders have viewed paintings of water buffalo as ‘casual’ art and analysed such artworks from an etic perspective. This paper offers an understanding of such artworks that is grounded in local ontological perceptions. The article demonstrates how artworks depicting water buffalo, as with other similar subject matter, were used as a tool for navigating change and for maintaining order in the face of dramatic changes.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

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Prof. Tracy Ireland, Director of the Centre for Creative & Cultural Research, University of Canberra.

https://researchprofiles.canberra.edu.au/en/persons/tracy-ireland 

Heritage of the Air Project    https://heritageoftheair.org.au/

 

Publications:  

https://heritageoftheair.org.au/publications/#

http://connectingthenation.net.au/

 

Assoc. Prof. Alice Gorman, Flinders University.

Faculty member of the International Space University's Southern Hemisphere Space Program

https://www.flinders.edu.au/people/alice.gorman

 

Assoc. Prof. Justin St. P. Walsh, Chapman University.

https://www.chapman.edu/our-faculty/justin-walsh

 

The International space Station Archaeology Project: 

https://issarchaeology.org/

 

Publications: 

Walsh, J. & Gorman, A. in press. 'A methodology for research in space archaeology: The International Space Station Archaeological Project'.  

Gorman, A. 2020. 'Space heritage: artefacts and archaeology', Journal & Proceedings of the Royal Society of New South Wales 153 (1): 94-96.

Salmond, W. Walsh, J. & Gorman, A. 2020. 'Eternity in Low Earth Orbit: Icons on the International Space Station', Religions 11: 611.

Gorman, A. 2019. Dr Space Junk vs. The Universe: Archaeology and the Future. Sydney, New South Books.

 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Hannah Friedman, Dr. Katherine Huntley, Libarna Urban Landscapes Project

https://libarnaarchproject.org/about/

http://www.fastionline.org/docs/FOLDER-it-2018-415.pdf

https://www.boisestate.edu/history/faculty-staff/katie-huntley/

https://ko-fi.com/LibarnaULP

The Libarna Urban Landscapes Project is the first research driven, systematic investigation of the ancient city of Libarna conducted since its discovery in the late 18th century. As an important settlement in the region of Gallia Cisalpina (“Gaul on our side of the alps” as the Romans called it), Libarna represents an opportunity to better understand Roman colonies and cultural interaction in northern Italy. 

 

Dr. Jim Morris, University of Central Lancashire

https://www.uclan.ac.uk/staff_profiles/dr_james_morris.php

 

Prof. Duncan Sayer, University of Central Lancashire

https://www.uclan.ac.uk/staff_profiles/dr_duncan_sayer.php

http://www.ribchesterrevisted.uk/

Ribchester Revisited is an archaeological project based in the heart of Ribchester. The project is run by the University of Central Lancashire, in conjunction with project partners Ribchester Roman Museum, the Australian National University, and the Institute for Field Research. Ribchester Revisited aims to explore the complex archaeology of the Roman fort, as well as its associations with the vicus (town just outside the fort).

 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Prof. Sean Ulm, James Cook University.

https://research.jcu.edu.au/portfolio/sean.ulm/ 

ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage.

https://epicaustralia.org.au/

Ulm, S. 2013. ‘‘Complexity’ and the Australian continental narrative: Themes in the archaeology of Holocene Australia’. Quaternary International 285: 182-192.

Kreij, A., Scriffignano, J., Rosendahl, D., Nagel, T. and Ulm, S. 2018. ‘Aboriginal stone-walled intertidal fishtrap morphology, function and chronology investigated with high-resolution close-range Unmanned Aerial Vehicle photogrammetry’. Journal of Archaeological Science 96: 148-161.

Mackenzie, L., Moss, P., and Ulm, S. 2020. ‘A late-Holocene record of coastal wetland development and fire regimes in tropical northern Australia’, The Holocene, 30 (10): 1379-1390.

Benjamin, J., O'Leary, M., McDonald, J., Wiseman, C., McCarthy, J., Beckett, E., Morrison, P., Stankiewicz, F., Leach, J., Hacker, J., Baggaley, P., Jerbić, K., Fowler, M., Fairweather, J., Jeffries, P., Ulm, S. and Bailey, G. 2020. ‘Aboriginal artefacts on the continental shelf reveal ancient drowned cultural landscapes in northwest Australia’. PLoS ONE 15 (7): 1-31.

 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Matthew Symonds, Current World Archaeology.

https://www.world-archaeology.com/

Symonds, M. 2020. 'Fords and the frontier: waging counter-mobility on
Hadrian’s Wall', Antiquity 94 (373): 92-109.

Symonds, M. 2021. Hadrian's Wall: creating division. Bloomsbury Academic.

Mobility on the Tyne–Solway isthmus constitutes a
gap in our understanding of the planning and functioning
of the Roman frontier of northern Britain.
Although the inflexible design of Hadrian’s Wall
appears insensitive to variations in local environment,
identification of potential Roman-period
fords suggests that securing river crossings was
an important influence on military plans. The
Roman army exploited established routeways to
impose increasingly sophisticated systems to structure
movement, initially via a system of forts, fortlets
and towers—the Stanegate—and subsequently
using a continuous barrier: Hadrian’s Wall. As
these measures evolved, so local communities
experienced greater levels of military control and inequality.

 

Dr. Rob Collins, Newcastle University.

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/hca/staff/profile/robertcollins.html#publications

Collins, R. 2020. ‘The Phallus and the Frontier: The Form and Function of Phallic Imagery Along Hadrian’s Wall. In: Ivleva, T. & Collins, R. (eds.) Un-Roman Sex: Gender, Sexuality, and Lovemaking in the Roman Provinces and Frontiers. NY: Routledge.

The phallus is a ubiquitous symbol across the ancient world, visualised across
the spectrum in exquisite (or excruciating) naturalistic detail to abstracted iconographic
representations (Chapters 4, 5, and 10). These representations are not
limited to a single medium, but are found in sculpture, portable objects,
mosaics, frescoes, and more generic carvings. As has been eloquently argued
and appreciated for some time now (Johns 1982), the phallus can be symptomatic
of eroticism in the Roman world, but it often invoked and performed
a magical, apotropaic function. While undeniably true,
the apotropaic function covers a broad range of use and intention. Archaeology
offers the potential to explore and refine our understanding of the magic and/or
erotic phallus, particularly in those instances where a phallus is found in situ
and with an associated context. Given that Pompeii is commonly held up as an
example of the frequency and commonality of phalli in the Roman world, it is
essential to explore the frequency and occurrence of phalli in other locations
and cultural situations.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Prof. Maureen Carroll, University of York

https://www.york.ac.uk/archaeology/people/academic-staff/carroll/#research-content

Carroll, M. 2018. Infancy and Earliest Childhood in the Roman world: a fragment of time. Oxford University Press. 

Despite the developing emphasis in current scholarship on children in Roman culture, there has been relatively little research to date on the role and significance of the youngest children within the family and in society. This volume singles out this youngest age group, the under one-year-olds, in the first comprehensive study of infancy and earliest childhood to encompass the Roman Empire as a whole: integrating social and cultural history with archaeological evidence, funerary remains, material culture, and the iconography of infancy, it explores how the very particular historical circumstances into which Roman children were born affected their lives as well as prevailing attitudes towards them. Examination of these varied strands of evidence, drawn from throughout the Roman world from the fourth century BC to the third century AD, allows the rhetoric about earliest childhood in Roman texts to be more broadly contextualized and reveals the socio-cultural developments that took place in parent-child relationships over this period. Presenting a fresh perspective on archaeological and historical debates, the volume refutes the notion that high infant mortality conditioned Roman parents not to engage in the early life of their children or to view them, or their deaths, with indifference, and concludes that even within the first weeks and months of life Roman children were invested with social and gendered identities and were perceived as having both personhood and value within society.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Prof. Hella Eckardt, University of Reading.

https://www.reading.ac.uk/archaeology/about/staff/h-eckardt.aspx

Sandie Williams, University of Reading.

https://independent.academia.edu/SandieWilliams

 

Eckardt, H. & Williams, S. 2018. 'The Sound of Magic? Bells in Roman Britain', Britannia 49: 179–210.

Bells are recorded in many published excavation reports from Roman sites, but there has been no
previous study of the British material. This paper explores the significance of bells in the Roman
world from both a ritual and a functional perspective. We create a first typology of Romano-
British bells, provide an understanding of their chronology and examine any spatial and social
differences in their use. Special attention is paid to bells from funerary or ritual contexts in
order to explore the symbolic significance of these small objects. Bells from other parts of the
Roman world are considered to provide comparisons with those from Roman Britain. The
paper demonstrates that small bells were used as protective charms and may have been
preferentially placed into the graves of children and young women. The paper identifies a new,
probably Roman type of bell that has no parallels within the Empire, although similar pieces
occur in first- and second-century graves in the Black Sea region.
Keywords: Roman bells; amulets; burial; ritual; openwork bells; Black Sea.

 

Dr. Magali Bailliot

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Magali_Bailliot

Bailliot, M. 2015. ‘Roman Magic Figurines from the Western Provinces of the Roman Empire: An Archaeological Survey’, Britannia 46: 93–110.

Bailliot, M. 2019. ‘Rome and the Roman Empire’, in Frankfurter, D. (ed.) Guide to the Study of Ancient Magic. Brill, pp. 175-197.

This paper deals with magic figurines from the Western provinces of the Roman Empire based on
an inventory of twelve figurines and their archaeological context. It underlines the place of the
figurines in the ritual of defixio and demonstrates that complex curse rituals such as those
described in the Greek Magical Papyri (GMP) were not performed only in the Mediterranean
basin. It also notes that these magic Western figurines are often found in important places
(such as cities and large villas) and in late contexts.
Keywords: figurines; magic; defixio; curse rituals; Roman Western provinces; Fishbourne; Greek Magical Papyri.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Lisa Lodwick, All Souls College, Oxford.

https://www.asc.ox.ac.uk/person/3377

Lodwick, L. 2017. ‘Evergreen Plants in Roman Britain and Beyond: Movement, Meaning and Materiality’ Britannia 48: 135–173.

Lodwick, L. 2019. ‘Agendas for Archaeobotany in the 21st Century: data, dissemination and new directions’, Internet Archaeology 53:7.

In tandem with the large-scale translocation of food plants in the Roman world, ornamental
evergreen plants and plant items were also introduced to new areas for ritual and ornamental
purposes. The extent to which these new plants, primarily box and stone-pine, were grown in
Britain has yet to be established. This paper presents a synthesis of archaeobotanical records
of box, stone-pine and norway spruce in Roman Britain, highlighting chronological and spatial
patterns. Archaeobotanical evidence is used alongside material culture to evaluate the
movement of these plants and plant items into Roman Britain, their meaning and materiality in
the context of human-plant relations in ornamental gardens and ritual activities.
Archaeobotanical evidence for ornamental evergreen plants elsewhere in the Roman world is
presented.
Keywords: box; stone-pine; Roman Britain; Roman gardens; ritual activity; plant materiality; archaeobotany.

 

Prof. Patty Baker, Associate of University of Kent

https://kent.academia.edu/PatriciaBaker

Baker, P.  2018. ‘Pure Air’ and physical and mental health in Pompeian gardens (c.150 BC–AD 79): a multi-sensory approach to ancient medicine, World Archaeology, 50:3, 404-417.

Baker, P. 2013. The Archaeology of Medicine in the Greco-Roman World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
 
Baker. P. & Savani, G. 2019. “‘Contriv’d according to the Strictest Rules of Art’: The Reception of Roman Baths and Gardens at the Villa Albani.” Conference  Il cardinale Alessandro Albani: collezionismo, diplomazia e mercato nell’Europa del Grand Tour.” British School at Rome, Italy, December 2019, 11-13.

 
Different genres of Roman literature commented on the relationship between
the condition of the environment and health. They often refer to clear, pure
or good air as a beneficial aspect of the environment. Yet, unlike fetid air, they
provide few descriptions of what constituted healthy air quality. Aside from
the association between the environment and bodily condition, they also did
not explain how the link between the two was made. This paper utilizes a
comparative study of ancient literature and the archaeological remains of
Roman gardens in Pompeii: archaeobotanical samples; fresco paintings; location;
and surviving features. The following questions are addressed in this
study. How did the Romans identify and define pure air? How did air connect
to the body? What were the qualities of pure air and how did they benefit the
body? Inhalation and sensory perception were both ways air was linked to the
body. The author argues that sight, sound and olfaction were used to identify
the qualities of pure air. Through this process, the beneficial properties of
pure air were, in accordance to ancient perceptions of sensory function, taken
into the body and affected health. Thus, sensory perception was the bridge
between the environment and health.
 
 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Cristina Murer, Universität Bern

https://www.hist.unibe.ch/ueber_uns/personen/murer_cristina/index_ger.html

Murer, C. 2018.  From the tombs into the city: grave robbing and the re-use of Roman funerary material in late antique Italy', ActaAArtHist 30: 115-137.

Murer, C. Forthcoming.  Transforming the Past: Tomb Plundering and the Reuse of Funerary Material in Late Antique Italy. 

https://www.hist.unibe.ch/forschung/forschungsprojekte/plundering_reusing_and_transforming_the_past/index_ger.html

There is some really fascinating research going on right now into the plundering of Roman period tombs. I spoke to Dr. Cristina Murer of the university of Bern about her research on plundering in late antiquity. Ornaments from tombs, sometimes called the spolia, were reused and recycled as artefacts, in any number of different ways. But this wasn’t merely grave robbing. There was often a high degree of organisation, and in some cases it wasn’t outlawed. It was officially sanctioned. 

 

 

Dr. Liana Brent, Kenyon College

https://www.kenyon.edu/directory/liana-brent/

Brent, L. 2017. Disturbed, Damaged and Disarticulated: Grave Reuse in Roman Italy’,  TRAC 2016 Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference: 37-50.

Brent, L. 2020. 'Sealed and revealed: Roman grave opening practices', Journal of Roman Archaeology 33: 129-146.

This paper addresses questions about Roman encounters with bodies after funerary rites
were carried out and completed. Why did Romans reopen burials? Relatedly, how did the
state of the corpse or skeletal remains at the time of grave reopening influence the manner of reuse or post-depositional manipulation? My primary interest is what happened in post-burial
encounters with intentionally or accidentally exhumed individuals, as well as the types of
evidence that we use to understand these experiences. This paper explores how post-depositional
activities affected decomposing and disarticulated human skeletal remains through a
case study from the Roman cemetery at Vagnari. I argue that the addition of individuals and
the manipulation of human skeletal elements were often the creation and maintenance of corporeal
connections between the deceased and the living, rather than acts of tomb violation,
as we might be tempted to understand these phenomena from epigraphic and legal sources.

 

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