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Victoria Ziegler, Institute of Archaeology, University College London.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/people/research-students/victoria-ziegler

PhD Thesis: A study of urban trans-location in early medieval England: occupation identities in Saxon London 770-1020

 

Publication:

Victoria Ziegler (2019) 'From wic to burh: a new approach to the question of the development of Early Medieval London', Archaeological Journal, 176:2, 336-368, DOI:
10.1080/00665983.2019.1573553
To link to this article: https://doi.org/10.1080/00665983.2019.1573553

During the ninth century the focus of occupation in Saxon London
shifted eastwards from the Covent Garden area back to the former
Roman city of Londinium. Combining detailed case studies with
the results of correspondence analysis, this paper critically compares
archaeological features and assemblages at sites dated c. AD
770 to c. AD 850 in Middle Saxon Lundenwic with sites dated c. AD
850 to c. AD 950 in Late Saxon Lundenburh. Differences in the
archaeology of the two settlements are discussed. These distinctions
reveal specific areas of discontinuity that strongly support
current models of a hiatus between the decline of Lundenwic and
renewed activity in Lundenburh.

 

Prof. Helena Hamerow, School of Archaeology, University of Oxford.

https://www.arch.ox.ac.uk/people/hamerow-helena#/

 

Publication:

HAMEROW, H. BOGAARD, A. CHARLES, M. FORSTER, E. HOLMES, M,. MCKERRACHER, M. NEIL, S. BRONK RAMSEY, C. STROUD, E. & THOMAS, R. 2020. ‘An Integrated Bioarchaeological Approach to the Medieval ‘Agricultural Revolution’: A Case Study from Stafford, England, c. AD 800–1200’, European Journal of Archaeology 23 (4), 585–609.

In much of Europe, the advent of low-input cereal farming regimes between c. AD 800 and 1200 enabled
landowners—lords—to amass wealth by greatly expanding the amount of land under cultivation and
exploiting the labour of others. Scientific analysis of plant remains and animal bones from archaeological
contexts is generating the first direct evidence for the development of such low-input regimes. This article
outlines the methods used by the FeedSax project to resolve key questions regarding the ‘cerealization’ of
the medieval countryside and presents preliminary results using the town of Stafford as a worked example.
These indicate an increase in the scale of cultivation in the Mid-Saxon period, while the Late Saxon
period saw a shift to a low-input cultivation regime and probably an expansion onto heavier soils. Crop
rotation appears to have been practised from at least the mid-tenth century.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

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Aina Heen Pettersen, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology

https://www.ntnu.edu/employees/aina.pettersen

PhD Thesis: Farin Vestir: Perspectives on the chronology, biography and mutability of Insular objects in Viking-Age Norway (c. AD 770/800-950).

 

Publication:

Pettersen, Aina Margrethe Heen 2019. The Earliest Wave of Viking Activity? The Norwegian Evidence Revisited. European Journal of Archaeology 22 (4), 523–541

This article discusses the chronology and nature of the earliest Viking activity, based on a group of early
burials from Norway containing Insular metalwork. By focusing on the geographical distribution of this
material and applying the concept of locational and social knowledge, the importance of establishing
cognitive landscapes to facilitate the Viking expansion is highlighted. It is argued that the first recorded
Viking attacks were only possible after a phase in which Norse seafarers had acquired the necessarily
level of a priori environmental knowledge needed to move in new seascapes and coastal environments.
This interaction model opens the possibility that some of the early Insular finds from Norway may
represent pre-Lindisfarne exploration voyages, carried out by seafarers along the sailing route of
Nordvegr.

 

 

Andreas Hennius, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, Sweden.

https://www.arkeologi.uu.se/staff/Presentations/andreas-hennius_en/

Dr. John Ljungkvist, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University, Sweden.

https://www.arkeologi.uu.se/staff/Presentations/john-ljungkvist-en/

 

Publication:

Hennius. A, Gustavsson, R. Ljungkvist, J. & Spindler, L. 2018. Whalebone Gaming Pieces: Aspects of Marine Mammal Exploitation in Vendel and Viking Age Scandinavia. European Journal of Archaeology 21 (4), 612–631.

Discussions of pre-Viking trade and production have for many decades focused on products made of
precious metals, glass and, to some degree, iron. This is hardly surprising considering the difficulties in
finding and provenancing products made of organic matter. In this article we examine gaming pieces
made from bone and antler, which are not unusual in Scandinavian burials in the Vendel and Viking
period (c. AD 550–1050). A special emphasis is placed on whalebone pieces that appear to dominate
after around AD 550, signalling a large-scale production and exploitation of North Atlantic whale products.
In combination with other goods such as bear furs, birds of prey, and an increased iron and tar
production, whalebone products are part of an intensified large-scale outland exploitation and indicate
strong, pre-urban trading routes across Scandinavia and Europe some 200 years before the Viking
period and well before the age of the emporia.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

 

Prof. Duncan Sayer, University of Central Lancashire

https://www.uclan.ac.uk/staff_profiles/dr_duncan_sayer.php

http://www.ribchesterrevisted.uk/

 

Open Access Publication:

Sayer, D. 2020. Early Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries: Kinship, Community and Identity. Manchester University Press.

https://www.manchesteropenhive.com/view/9781526153845/9781526153845.xml

Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries are well-known because of their rich grave goods, but this wealth can obscure their importance as local phenomena and the product of pluralistic multi-generational communities. This book explores over one hundred early Anglo-Saxon and some Merovingian cemeteries and aims to understand them using a multi-dimensional methodology. The performance of mortuary drama was a physical communication and so needed syntax and semantics. This local knowledge was used to negotiate the arrangement of cemetery spaces and to construct the stories that were told within them. For some families the emphasis of a mortuary ritual was on reinforcing and reproducing family narratives, but this was only one technique used to arrange cemetery space. This book offers an alternative way to explore the horizontal organisation of cemeteries from a holistic perspective. Each chapter builds on the last, using visual aesthetics, leitmotifs, spatial statistics, grave orientation, density of burial, mortuary ritual, grave goods, grave robbing, barrows, integral structures, skeletal trauma, stature, gender and age to build a detailed picture of complex mortuary spaces. This approach places community at the forefront of interpretation because people used and reused cemetery spaces and these people chose to emphasise different characteristics of the deceased because of their own attitudes, lifeways and lived experiences. This book will appeal to scholars of Anglo-Saxon studies and will also be of value to archaeologists interested in mortuary spaces, communities and social differentiation because it proposes a way to move beyond grave goods in the discussion of complex social identities. 

eISBN: 9781526153845
Online Publication Date: 03 Dec 2020

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

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