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Pamela Chauvel, University of Sydney.

https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Pamela-Chauvel-2169341354

 

Dr. James L. Flexner, University of Sydney. 

https://www.sydney.edu.au/arts/about/our-people/academic-staff/james-flexner.html

 

Publication:

Chauvel, P., Flexner, J. (2020). Mapping Difference in the "Uniform" Workers' cottages of Maria Island, Tasmania. International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 24(4), 902-919. [More Information]

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, company towns often provided
housing for workers within a system of benevolent paternalism. This paper examines a
set of workers’ cottages known as “the Twelve Apostles” on Maria Island, Tasmania.
The archaeology reveals differences between the standardized, company-built houses,
providing evidence that the residents’ responses often varied in ways that were not
officially expected or sanctioned by the company. People individualized their houses in
ways that reflect their everyday routines and rituals, and demonstrate how they made these houses into homes.
Keywords Maria Island . Tasmania . Household archaeology. Capitalism. Paternalism.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

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Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

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Dave Johnston, Australian Indigenous Archaeologists' Association

https://www.anu.edu.au/alumni/our-alumni/spotlight/david-johnston

https://www.foxtel.com.au/whats-on/foxtel-insider/latest-news/coast-australia-s4.html

When David Johnston was a boy, he keenly explored the caves near his home, leading his mother to suggest he might become an archaeologist. Later, he became one of the first Indigenous Australians to gain a degree in archaeology, graduating from ANU with Honours and completing a Master degree in London.

Conserving the nation's Aboriginal heritage is Dave's passion. As a consultant archaeologist for 27 years, he has worked on more than 2,000 heritage projects across eastern Australia from Cape York to Point Nepean.

In 2014, he was awarded the Sharon Sullivan National Heritage award for his outstanding contribution to the Indigenous heritage environment and his continuing influence on practice.

Dave has had a remarkable career and is recognised as a world leader in the field of Australian Indigenous archaeology.

He has made important contributions to the field and its development at Australian universities as well as working to ensure an Indigenous perspective and voice in the study and teaching of Australian archaeology.

His contributions have been recognised internationally. He was involved in the development of a code of ethics for the World Archaeological Congress and also drove the adoption of a code of ethics by the Australian Archaeological Association.

He was instrumental in the development of the Australian Government's guidelines for Indigenous heritage and was a member of the AIATSIS Research Ethics Committee that developed the Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies.

Dave has been active at ANU since he graduated, most recently being the Founding Chair of the ANU Indigenous Alumni Network, which he and Indigenous Alumni members established in 2016.

He delivers annual guest lectures and co-ordinates two to three local community-run archaeological site visits a year for the Archaeology School as well as guest lecturing for two other ANU schools.

He has been a board member of the University's Aboriginal History Journal for 19 years and has been a long-time supporter of the Tjabal Centre, being one of its Foundation students.

 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Prof. Eleanor Casella, University of Tasmania

https://www.utas.edu.au/humanities#history-and-classics

https://www.utas.edu.au/arts-law-education/study/convict-archaeology 

https://utas.academia.edu/EleanorCasella

 

Publications:

Casella, E. C. 2002. Archaeology of the Ross Female Factory: Female Incarceration in Van Diemen's Land, Australia. Launceston, Tasmania : Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery.

Casella, E. C. 2016. 'Horizons beyond the Perimeter Wall: Relational Materiality, Institutional Confinement, and the Archaeology of Being Global', Historical Archaeology 50(3) 127-143.

As historical archaeologists, how might we begin to unpick the complex material webs of trades, migrations, and technologies that constitute globalization? How should we simultaneously understand the local and transnational meanings of our study sites? Through examples based around the 19th-century transportation of British felons to the Australian penal colonies, this article considers how recent work in relational theory offers fresh directions for exploring how the process of “being global” enmeshes humans, artifacts, and landscapes into ever-wider meshworks of connection and significance. It suggests that by traveling along the dynamic awful lines of globalization from the inside out, we archaeologists can consider not only what alternatives could have been, but what might be in our future.

 

Dr. Peta Longhurst, University of Sydney Alumna.

https://www.researchgate.net/scientific-contributions/Peta-Longhurst-2112990062 

 

Publications:

Longhurst, P. 2018. 'Contagious objects: artefacts of disease transmission and control at North Head Quarantine Station, Australia', World Archaeology, 50:3, 512-529.

https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/17906 

From 1828 to 1984, North Head Quarantine Station was the first port of call
for many immigrants seeking a new life in Australia. The institution was
intended to confine disease, via the bodies and objects that conveyed it,
and prevent it from spreading throughout the Sydney populace. Despite
being a public health institution, an initial functional analysis found that
only a small subset of artefacts associated with the site were medical in
nature. This article draws on the assemblage of North Head to consider
how the material culture of quarantine extends beyond medical instruments.
By re-evaluating the assemblage through a disease-centred, ‘epidemiological’
lens, the author demonstrates how disease permeates throughout the quarantine
assemblage, enmeshing artefacts, bodies and contagions within a
complex web of relations.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

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