Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Hannah Friedman, Dr. Katherine Huntley, Libarna Urban Landscapes Project

https://libarnaarchproject.org/about/

http://www.fastionline.org/docs/FOLDER-it-2018-415.pdf

https://www.boisestate.edu/history/faculty-staff/katie-huntley/

https://ko-fi.com/LibarnaULP

The Libarna Urban Landscapes Project is the first research driven, systematic investigation of the ancient city of Libarna conducted since its discovery in the late 18th century. As an important settlement in the region of Gallia Cisalpina (“Gaul on our side of the alps” as the Romans called it), Libarna represents an opportunity to better understand Roman colonies and cultural interaction in northern Italy. 

 

Dr. Jim Morris, University of Central Lancashire

https://www.uclan.ac.uk/staff_profiles/dr_james_morris.php

 

Prof. Duncan Sayer, University of Central Lancashire

https://www.uclan.ac.uk/staff_profiles/dr_duncan_sayer.php

http://www.ribchesterrevisted.uk/

Ribchester Revisited is an archaeological project based in the heart of Ribchester. The project is run by the University of Central Lancashire, in conjunction with project partners Ribchester Roman Museum, the Australian National University, and the Institute for Field Research. Ribchester Revisited aims to explore the complex archaeology of the Roman fort, as well as its associations with the vicus (town just outside the fort).

 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Prof. Sean Ulm, James Cook University.

https://research.jcu.edu.au/portfolio/sean.ulm/ 

ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage.

https://epicaustralia.org.au/

Ulm, S. 2013. ‘‘Complexity’ and the Australian continental narrative: Themes in the archaeology of Holocene Australia’. Quaternary International 285: 182-192.

Kreij, A., Scriffignano, J., Rosendahl, D., Nagel, T. and Ulm, S. 2018. ‘Aboriginal stone-walled intertidal fishtrap morphology, function and chronology investigated with high-resolution close-range Unmanned Aerial Vehicle photogrammetry’. Journal of Archaeological Science 96: 148-161.

Mackenzie, L., Moss, P., and Ulm, S. 2020. ‘A late-Holocene record of coastal wetland development and fire regimes in tropical northern Australia’, The Holocene, 30 (10): 1379-1390.

Benjamin, J., O'Leary, M., McDonald, J., Wiseman, C., McCarthy, J., Beckett, E., Morrison, P., Stankiewicz, F., Leach, J., Hacker, J., Baggaley, P., Jerbić, K., Fowler, M., Fairweather, J., Jeffries, P., Ulm, S. and Bailey, G. 2020. ‘Aboriginal artefacts on the continental shelf reveal ancient drowned cultural landscapes in northwest Australia’. PLoS ONE 15 (7): 1-31.

 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Matthew Symonds, Current World Archaeology.

https://www.world-archaeology.com/

Symonds, M. 2020. 'Fords and the frontier: waging counter-mobility on
Hadrian’s Wall', Antiquity 94 (373): 92-109.

Symonds, M. 2021. Hadrian's Wall: creating division. Bloomsbury Academic.

Mobility on the Tyne–Solway isthmus constitutes a
gap in our understanding of the planning and functioning
of the Roman frontier of northern Britain.
Although the inflexible design of Hadrian’s Wall
appears insensitive to variations in local environment,
identification of potential Roman-period
fords suggests that securing river crossings was
an important influence on military plans. The
Roman army exploited established routeways to
impose increasingly sophisticated systems to structure
movement, initially via a system of forts, fortlets
and towers—the Stanegate—and subsequently
using a continuous barrier: Hadrian’s Wall. As
these measures evolved, so local communities
experienced greater levels of military control and inequality.

 

Dr. Rob Collins, Newcastle University.

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/hca/staff/profile/robertcollins.html#publications

Collins, R. 2020. ‘The Phallus and the Frontier: The Form and Function of Phallic Imagery Along Hadrian’s Wall. In: Ivleva, T. & Collins, R. (eds.) Un-Roman Sex: Gender, Sexuality, and Lovemaking in the Roman Provinces and Frontiers. NY: Routledge.

The phallus is a ubiquitous symbol across the ancient world, visualised across
the spectrum in exquisite (or excruciating) naturalistic detail to abstracted iconographic
representations (Chapters 4, 5, and 10). These representations are not
limited to a single medium, but are found in sculpture, portable objects,
mosaics, frescoes, and more generic carvings. As has been eloquently argued
and appreciated for some time now (Johns 1982), the phallus can be symptomatic
of eroticism in the Roman world, but it often invoked and performed
a magical, apotropaic function. While undeniably true,
the apotropaic function covers a broad range of use and intention. Archaeology
offers the potential to explore and refine our understanding of the magic and/or
erotic phallus, particularly in those instances where a phallus is found in situ
and with an associated context. Given that Pompeii is commonly held up as an
example of the frequency and commonality of phalli in the Roman world, it is
essential to explore the frequency and occurrence of phalli in other locations
and cultural situations.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Prof. Maureen Carroll, University of York

https://www.york.ac.uk/archaeology/people/academic-staff/carroll/#research-content

Carroll, M. 2018. Infancy and Earliest Childhood in the Roman world: a fragment of time. Oxford University Press. 

Despite the developing emphasis in current scholarship on children in Roman culture, there has been relatively little research to date on the role and significance of the youngest children within the family and in society. This volume singles out this youngest age group, the under one-year-olds, in the first comprehensive study of infancy and earliest childhood to encompass the Roman Empire as a whole: integrating social and cultural history with archaeological evidence, funerary remains, material culture, and the iconography of infancy, it explores how the very particular historical circumstances into which Roman children were born affected their lives as well as prevailing attitudes towards them. Examination of these varied strands of evidence, drawn from throughout the Roman world from the fourth century BC to the third century AD, allows the rhetoric about earliest childhood in Roman texts to be more broadly contextualized and reveals the socio-cultural developments that took place in parent-child relationships over this period. Presenting a fresh perspective on archaeological and historical debates, the volume refutes the notion that high infant mortality conditioned Roman parents not to engage in the early life of their children or to view them, or their deaths, with indifference, and concludes that even within the first weeks and months of life Roman children were invested with social and gendered identities and were perceived as having both personhood and value within society.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Prof. Hella Eckardt, University of Reading.

https://www.reading.ac.uk/archaeology/about/staff/h-eckardt.aspx

Sandie Williams, University of Reading.

https://independent.academia.edu/SandieWilliams

 

Eckardt, H. & Williams, S. 2018. 'The Sound of Magic? Bells in Roman Britain', Britannia 49: 179–210.

Bells are recorded in many published excavation reports from Roman sites, but there has been no
previous study of the British material. This paper explores the significance of bells in the Roman
world from both a ritual and a functional perspective. We create a first typology of Romano-
British bells, provide an understanding of their chronology and examine any spatial and social
differences in their use. Special attention is paid to bells from funerary or ritual contexts in
order to explore the symbolic significance of these small objects. Bells from other parts of the
Roman world are considered to provide comparisons with those from Roman Britain. The
paper demonstrates that small bells were used as protective charms and may have been
preferentially placed into the graves of children and young women. The paper identifies a new,
probably Roman type of bell that has no parallels within the Empire, although similar pieces
occur in first- and second-century graves in the Black Sea region.
Keywords: Roman bells; amulets; burial; ritual; openwork bells; Black Sea.

 

Dr. Magali Bailliot

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Magali_Bailliot

Bailliot, M. 2015. ‘Roman Magic Figurines from the Western Provinces of the Roman Empire: An Archaeological Survey’, Britannia 46: 93–110.

Bailliot, M. 2019. ‘Rome and the Roman Empire’, in Frankfurter, D. (ed.) Guide to the Study of Ancient Magic. Brill, pp. 175-197.

This paper deals with magic figurines from the Western provinces of the Roman Empire based on
an inventory of twelve figurines and their archaeological context. It underlines the place of the
figurines in the ritual of defixio and demonstrates that complex curse rituals such as those
described in the Greek Magical Papyri (GMP) were not performed only in the Mediterranean
basin. It also notes that these magic Western figurines are often found in important places
(such as cities and large villas) and in late contexts.
Keywords: figurines; magic; defixio; curse rituals; Roman Western provinces; Fishbourne; Greek Magical Papyri.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Lisa Lodwick, All Souls College, Oxford.

https://www.asc.ox.ac.uk/person/3377

Lodwick, L. 2017. ‘Evergreen Plants in Roman Britain and Beyond: Movement, Meaning and Materiality’ Britannia 48: 135–173.

Lodwick, L. 2019. ‘Agendas for Archaeobotany in the 21st Century: data, dissemination and new directions’, Internet Archaeology 53:7.

In tandem with the large-scale translocation of food plants in the Roman world, ornamental
evergreen plants and plant items were also introduced to new areas for ritual and ornamental
purposes. The extent to which these new plants, primarily box and stone-pine, were grown in
Britain has yet to be established. This paper presents a synthesis of archaeobotanical records
of box, stone-pine and norway spruce in Roman Britain, highlighting chronological and spatial
patterns. Archaeobotanical evidence is used alongside material culture to evaluate the
movement of these plants and plant items into Roman Britain, their meaning and materiality in
the context of human-plant relations in ornamental gardens and ritual activities.
Archaeobotanical evidence for ornamental evergreen plants elsewhere in the Roman world is
presented.
Keywords: box; stone-pine; Roman Britain; Roman gardens; ritual activity; plant materiality; archaeobotany.

 

Prof. Patty Baker, Associate of University of Kent

https://kent.academia.edu/PatriciaBaker

Baker, P.  2018. ‘Pure Air’ and physical and mental health in Pompeian gardens (c.150 BC–AD 79): a multi-sensory approach to ancient medicine, World Archaeology, 50:3, 404-417.

Baker, P. 2013. The Archaeology of Medicine in the Greco-Roman World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
 
Baker. P. & Savani, G. 2019. “‘Contriv’d according to the Strictest Rules of Art’: The Reception of Roman Baths and Gardens at the Villa Albani.” Conference  Il cardinale Alessandro Albani: collezionismo, diplomazia e mercato nell’Europa del Grand Tour.” British School at Rome, Italy, December 2019, 11-13.

 
Different genres of Roman literature commented on the relationship between
the condition of the environment and health. They often refer to clear, pure
or good air as a beneficial aspect of the environment. Yet, unlike fetid air, they
provide few descriptions of what constituted healthy air quality. Aside from
the association between the environment and bodily condition, they also did
not explain how the link between the two was made. This paper utilizes a
comparative study of ancient literature and the archaeological remains of
Roman gardens in Pompeii: archaeobotanical samples; fresco paintings; location;
and surviving features. The following questions are addressed in this
study. How did the Romans identify and define pure air? How did air connect
to the body? What were the qualities of pure air and how did they benefit the
body? Inhalation and sensory perception were both ways air was linked to the
body. The author argues that sight, sound and olfaction were used to identify
the qualities of pure air. Through this process, the beneficial properties of
pure air were, in accordance to ancient perceptions of sensory function, taken
into the body and affected health. Thus, sensory perception was the bridge
between the environment and health.
 
 

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Support future seasons of the show: https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

Buy Foreign Countries a coffee:

https://ko-fi.com/foreigncountriespodcast

https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=9G7GV9X432PN6

 

Dr. Cristina Murer, Universität Bern

https://www.hist.unibe.ch/ueber_uns/personen/murer_cristina/index_ger.html

Murer, C. 2018.  From the tombs into the city: grave robbing and the re-use of Roman funerary material in late antique Italy', ActaAArtHist 30: 115-137.

Murer, C. Forthcoming.  Transforming the Past: Tomb Plundering and the Reuse of Funerary Material in Late Antique Italy. 

https://www.hist.unibe.ch/forschung/forschungsprojekte/plundering_reusing_and_transforming_the_past/index_ger.html

There is some really fascinating research going on right now into the plundering of Roman period tombs. I spoke to Dr. Cristina Murer of the university of Bern about her research on plundering in late antiquity. Ornaments from tombs, sometimes called the spolia, were reused and recycled as artefacts, in any number of different ways. But this wasn’t merely grave robbing. There was often a high degree of organisation, and in some cases it wasn’t outlawed. It was officially sanctioned. 

 

 

Dr. Liana Brent, Kenyon College

https://www.kenyon.edu/directory/liana-brent/

Brent, L. 2017. Disturbed, Damaged and Disarticulated: Grave Reuse in Roman Italy’,  TRAC 2016 Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference: 37-50.

Brent, L. 2020. 'Sealed and revealed: Roman grave opening practices', Journal of Roman Archaeology 33: 129-146.

This paper addresses questions about Roman encounters with bodies after funerary rites
were carried out and completed. Why did Romans reopen burials? Relatedly, how did the
state of the corpse or skeletal remains at the time of grave reopening influence the manner of reuse or post-depositional manipulation? My primary interest is what happened in post-burial
encounters with intentionally or accidentally exhumed individuals, as well as the types of
evidence that we use to understand these experiences. This paper explores how post-depositional
activities affected decomposing and disarticulated human skeletal remains through a
case study from the Roman cemetery at Vagnari. I argue that the addition of individuals and
the manipulation of human skeletal elements were often the creation and maintenance of corporeal
connections between the deceased and the living, rather than acts of tomb violation,
as we might be tempted to understand these phenomena from epigraphic and legal sources.

 

This is a podcast about new and innovative research in archaeology.

Each episode I talk with pioneering and influential archaeologists about their journal papers, books and research projects.

Season 1 is all about the latest research into the Archaeology of the Roman West.

Season 2 is on Innovative Research in Australia.

Season 3 is on Early Medieval Europe.

Future Seasons:  Well, I'm open to suggestions!  

Medieval Europe, Osteoarchaeology, Mesoamerica, Pacific Archaeology, Prehistoric Burials, Post-Medieval, Scientific Techniques, South-east Asia, Bronze Age Monuments. You tell me!

So, if you would like to hear seasons 3, 4, 5 and more, then you might like to become a Patron of the show. Just click the Patron button:

https://patron.podbean.com/ForeignCountries

 

Podbean App

Play this podcast on Podbean App